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Posts Tagged ‘credit score’

No Reporting Credit on the Bureau – How to Fix it – By Vancouver Mortgage Broker Rowan Smith

Monday, April 30th, 2012

Transcript of Video Blog:

Hi everybody. Rowan Smith from the Mortgage Centre. I want to talk today about credit, specifically someone that doesn’t have a reporting credit score. I had a client call me this week who has tons of assets. They ran two different companies. The companies, the companies not her, have fantastic credit. The companies themselves have several hundred thousand dollars in clear assets cash. Now, she came into her bank before she spoke to me and the bank looked at her and said, “I’m sorry, we can’t help you. You don’t have a credit score.” She said, “Why not? I’ve got all these assets.”

Well, assets don’t report on your credit bureau. It doesn’t matter if you have $10 million in the bank. The credit bureau is about just that: credit. They want to specifically see that you know how to manage monthly payments without missing them, without falling into arrears or getting write-offs. If you’ve been paying cash your whole life for something I applaud that and think that that’s fantastic.

You haven’t had to borrow to live most of your life, certainly not the trend in Canada. Unfortunately, it’s not great for borrowing because you have no proof that you have a capacity to make payments or to manage a debt at all even though you’ve managed your savings fantastically. How do you get out of this trap?

First off, go and get a credit card. If you’ve got good assets and you’ve been paying everything with cash then your credit score will be nil for the most part. Apply to get a Visa. Start with that. Do you have to use it all the time? Not necessarily. Use it from time to time, make sure you pay it off. Try to keep that limit over $1,000, though. Ideally you want to get up over $5,000 because when the credit lenders look at you, especially if you’re applying for a mortgage, they want to make sure you can handle a payment that’s more than $50 a month.

If you’re looking to build and establish credit start with one card. You might want to get a couple. Don’t go crazy. 10 of them is not better than three or four and it just has more chances that one of those payments will get forgotten. Establish that score, get going on it, and then after a couple of years, or realistically even just one year of on time payments and reporting history, we should be able to get you into something.

That will establish that much needed credit history for vehicle loans, vehicle leases, commercial loans, all that type of thing.

If you need any help with this or if your bank is telling you you can’t get a Visa even though you’re offering to put your own money up as security I have a solution for you so please give me a call. It’s Rowan Smith from the Mortgage Centre.

Do Extra Payments Help Your Credit Score?

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Transcript of Video:
Hey everyone, Rowan Smith with the Mortgage Centre. I want to address a question a client came up with me on with the credit bureau. And that is, he wanted to know why his extra payments weren’t reflected.

The credit bureau is just a recording of debt payment history and how much your minimum payments are on a particular line of credit, and how your credit history is in terms of your repayment over the long last five years. Read the rest of this entry »

How Credit Scores are Calculated

Wednesday, June 10th, 2009

On every mortgage application, one of the first questions we hear from the lender is: can you send me their credit score. More and more borrowers are becoming aware that the manner in which they have handled their bills, over the past 5 years, has a material impact on their terms and rates on mortgage financing today. Just because a debt that went bad due to a divorce was ultimately paid, the effect can be long lasting, embarassing, and detrimental to future credit applications.

A nice breakdown of how credit scores are calculated came across my desk today and I wanted to post it so that people can see how their score is establisehed (or harmed):

FACTORS                                    WEIGHT          POINTS
Past Payment History               35%                   315
Credit Utilization                        30%                   270
Length of Credit History           15%                   135
Types of Credit in Use              10%                    90

Inquiries                                        10%                   90
TOTAL                                          100%                 900

In Canada we refer to this as your “Beacon Score” but in the USA it is more common to hear it referred to as a “FICO Score”

So, what does this all mean?

Past Payment History: Well, this one is obvious. If you miss a payment, it will show up on your credit and will have a VERY detrimental effect. However, in order to qualify as a “missed” payment, you needn’t be a day or week late. You must be really late. You have be one full payment cycle late before it shows up. So, if your bill is due on the 15th of June, and you forget and don’t pay it until the end of June, it is likely not going to show up on your credit bureau. However, if you miss the June 15th payment, and then miss the next one on July 15th, it absolutely will show up!

Credit Utilization: This the percentage of available credit being used. However, the credit score is calculated by a dumb computer so it doesn’t really do this calculation well. For example, if you owe $450 on a visa with a $500 limit then to the computer that does the scoring, that means you are utilizing 90% of your available credit. This is a very high percentage, and your score will suffer for it. However, if you owe a $450 on a $5,000 visa, it will have a positive effect on your score as the computer will see you are using less than 10% of available credit (even though the amount owing is the same). So, how you allocate your debt is important. It is far better to spread it out over several accounts, than load up one card. Then again, if you pay it off every month in full, you never have to worry about this.

Length of Credit History: The longest that an item remains on your credit is 72 months or 6 years. Each “Trade Line” or account reports the number of months reporting, and the longer the better. This can be important because people may have a Sears card they forget about that has 72 months reporting of good usage (even though they never ues it) and they always say, “should I cancel it?” I wouldn’t. That long lasting, but still current, account has a very positive impact on your score that can help mitigate other areas you may not score as well on.

Types of Credit in Use: Certain types of credit are worse than others. For example, finance companies (Wells Fargo, Citibank, etc…) score low, whereas visa cards and revolving credit facilities score high. Also, the number of recently opened accounts has an impact.

Inquires: This is the most misunderstood portion of the bureau, but one that people guard jealously. The more “inquiries” (companies looking at your credit score) the lower your score. However, you can see this accounts for only 10% of the score. Also, the folks operating the credit bureau don’t want to hamper you from shopping around, so all applications done within a 7 day period (for a similar type of account – mortgage versus finance company, for example) count as 1. More will show up, but the impact on your score is minimal. Also, you are allowed to have inquiries! Just because an inquiry was on there, doesn’t mean your score is low. However, if you apply at TD for a visa, RBC for a loan, a finance company for a secured card, and then Hydro pulls your bureau as well, you can expect it to drop. How much? Even then, it might be a few points. If you score well in other areas, you shouldn’t even be given this a thought. However, if you are re-building your score, you should monitor this carefully.

SCORES AND INTERPRETATION:

Minimum = 300
(Lowest I’ve ever seen is 393)

Maximum = 900
(Highest I’ve ever seen is 826)

Average = 660
(More likely 660-680)

A good score = 680+

A great score = 700+

So that should give you a good primer on what scores mean, how it is calculated, and what you can do to preserve yours.

Your credit is like your reputation: it takes years to build, and only a couple stupid moves to tear it all down…