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Posts Tagged ‘BFS’

Mythbusting Mortgages 4 – Tricky Bank Advertising Techniques

Friday, February 11th, 2011

Transcript of Video Blog:
Hi everyone. It’s Rowan Smith at the Mortgage Center. I want to address one of the most common myths that I receive questions about. That’s when a client goes into their bank and is told that they are going to be given 2.2 on a five year mortgage. So 2.2 would be the interest rate. The client comes to me, “What can you do on a five year fixed interest rate?” I say, “3.59 or 3.69.” They go, “Wow, well my bank is offering 2.2.”

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Mythbusting Mortgages 3 – My Bank Will Finance a Former Grow Op!

Friday, January 14th, 2011

Transcript of Video Blog:

Hey everyone! Rowan Smith at the Mortgage Centre. This week we’re doing Myth busting No. 3. This week’s myth is the old: “My bank did a former grow op property for me before so they will again.” That’s not necessarily the case. The industry hasn’t had this problem for that many years, at least not that they’ve been aware of. Properties now being branded as a former grow op in the property condition disclosure statement or in some places even on title has caused lenders to re think how their lending policies are when it comes to former grow ops. They don’t even say why, but what’s changed?

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Mythbusting Mortgages 2 – 35% Down? Who Needs a Job?

Tuesday, January 11th, 2011

Transcript of Video Blog:

Hi everybody! It’s Rowan Smith with the Mortgage Centre. We’re doing Myth busting #2 here and another one I want to address is the myth that if you have 35% down you don’t even need a job. That is patently incorrect!

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Mythbusting Mortgages 1 – I Don’t Have to Prove Income

Friday, January 7th, 2011

Transcript of Video Blog:

Hi everybody! Rowan Smith with the Mortgage Centre. We’re doing a Myth-busting series here. I’m going to do a 10 part series that I’m going to release over the following weeks. So, I’m just going to address a number of different myths within finance and real estate.

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Collateral Charges – Another Lender Gets On Board

Thursday, November 4th, 2010

Transcript of Video:

Hi, everybody. Rowan Smith with the Mortgage Centre.

I want to talk today about a change that was announced that’s been swept under the radar, and that’s that TD Bank has announced their mortgages will now be a collateral charge. Now what a collateral charge is, it differs than a traditional mortgage in that you can re-advance that mortgage back up to the amount or even beyond that you originally registered it for.

Now to a client, what does this mean? Let’s look at it from numbers. Let’s say you bought something for $500,000, you put 20 percent down under grant, and you had a mortgage for $400,000. Traditionally, as you paid down that mortgage, you could only advance it ever back up to the amount of the original mortgage, not beyond, and many institutions didn’t allow you to re-advance it at all.

However, a collateral charge allows you to register the mortgage for some fictional figure, perhaps the value of the home plus 25 percent — not the mortgage, but the value of the home plus 25 percent or more. Some institutions, such as Scotia, don’t even specify a limit.

Now, why they’re doing this is twofold. First off, for you the client, yes, it means convenience. What you’re going to be able to do is go back into the bank after a couple of years. You’ve paid your $400,000 mortgage down to $350,000, but let’s say you need $50,000 because you want to renovate. Well, rather than having to break the term and pay legal fees and all this type of stuff, you’ll be able to now just borrow back up to the $400,000, or beyond. If your home is worth more now, based on how much they registered the mortgage for.

It sounds very convenient, but the reality is it’s also a form of golden handcuffs, because once you’re into that type of charge, you can only get out of it by paying off the mortgage and moving it to another institution and paying the legal fees to do so. It’s a way of locking you up with that institution.

Now to anybody that’s had a mortgage for longer than one term, they’ll know that first offer that the bank gives you at renewal is never that great. So if you’re thinking you’re going to move your mortgage or you’re going to shop your mortgage at the end of your five-year term, if you’ve taken the new collateral charges from TD or from other institutions like that, chances are you’re not going to be able to shop it without eating some legal fees in there.

So primarily, it’s a customer retention tool as well as it does, in fact, add value through ease of use and ease of future access to your funds. Myself, I’m not a fan of them, however.

For the Mortgage Centre, I’m Rowan Smith.

Lines of Credit – An Update On A Specialized Product

Friday, October 15th, 2010

Transcript of Video Blog:

Hey everybody. Rowan Smith from The Mortgage Centre. I want to talk today about lines of credit. It’s been a while since I’ve done a post on it. I get a lot of questions on it, people not understanding when a line of credit is possible and what kind of rate they can expect. So first off, when is a line of credit possible? Well, you have to have 20% equity in the property. CMHC does not allow to have people have an interest only portion of their mortgage, so lines of credit are interest only. Typically, prime plus one is the going rate, although your institution may offer you something better if you have a very large investment portfolio or a longstanding connection with them. Prime plus one is the baseline rate by which you should be judging any particularly offers you are receiving for a line of credit. If you’ve got a $500, 000 home and you have a $350, 000 mortgage, you can only have 80% financing, that’s conventional financing, if you’re going to want a line of credit. Now, in that case, that’s $400, 000. If you’ve got 350 and the max is 400, the maximum line of credit you’re going to be able to get is 500. Now, that’s a secured line of credit and secured line of credit rates. Your institution or any other institution can offer you unsecured lines of credit all they want. How big they’ll go is generally an indication of how aggressive their policy is or how much debt they think you can service with your taxable income.

To give you an example of how this plays into it, I had somebody who was looking to qualify for a $50, 000 line of credit but they needed $80, 000 so they went to two different banks and applied for a $30, 000 line of credit and were declined at both of them because unsecured $30, 000 is very large. For secured you can have three million dollar lines of credit if you have the equity in the property, but when it comes to an unsecured line of credit the banks generally have a cap. Anything over $10, 000 and they start wanting to see a lot more net worth, a lot more fall back position, meaning vehicles, meaning cash assets, stocks, RSPs, savings, and what not.

You say, “well, if I had the savings I wouldn’t need the line of credit”, but in most cases people need a line of credit as a contingency, not as the primary source of their funding. There are secured lines of credit with your mortgage, can’t exceed 80% of the value of your home based on the appraisal, not based on list prices of other properties in your area. There are unsecured lines of credit which banks can do whatever they heck they want as long as they believe you and believe your credit rating is strong enough and that your income can service it. If you want any clarification on this, please contact me.

I’m Rowan Smith from The Mortgage Centre.

Divorce and Alimony and the Effect on Your Mortgage

Thursday, October 14th, 2010

Transcript of Video Blog:

Hi, everyone. Rowan Smith with the Mortgage Centre. I want to talk to everyone today about divorce agreements, alimony, child support, and that kind of thing and how they affect your mortgage application. A lot of times people will fill out on their application that they’re divorced. Maybe they are even buying a property with their new partner and the bank will ask them for a divorce agreement. And the person will say to me, but that was 15 years ago. Well, it doesn’t really matter. The bank still is going to want to see that document.

You’re going to have to disclose it. Now, you wonder why that is. There’s a few things that could be in a divorce agreement. For example, there could be alimony, spousal support, child support, any of these different things. Now that monthly payment is just like a debt. It’s just like a car loan. So it’s an obligation which affects your income, your bellied service debt. So a lot of times people will come to me and tell me: how much am I qualified for, I make $100, 000 a year? I spit a number back at them and then when we’re going through the application they inform me they have an $800 a month child support payment.

Well that has a very large impact on what they can approve for. So if you have been divorced tell your mortgage broker upfront if there’s any sort of alimony, child support, spousal support payments or any other continuing payments and obligations for anything you and your spouse may have had together. It may seem insignificant but these institutions are lending you hundreds of thousands of dollars so you can bet darn right that they have the right and will ask for this information. For the Mortgage Centre, I’m Rowan Smith.

File Your Taxes if You Are Self Employed!!!

Tuesday, September 28th, 2010

Transcript of Video:

Hi, everyone. It’s Rowan Smith from the Mortgage Centre. Today’s blog post is going to be very brief.

If you’re self-employed, file your 2009 taxes. If you haven’t filed them at this point in the year – and I don’t care when your fiscal year end is; I’m talking about your personal income taxes – file your income taxes.

If you haven’t filed them at this point, chances are I can’t help you. There might be exceptions to that depending on your industry and depending on a number of different factors, but please, call me before writing an offer if you haven’t filed your taxes. It is of paramount importance.

For the Mortgage Centre, I’m Rowan Smith.

CMHC Rule Changes in Effect TODAY

Monday, April 19th, 2010

April 19th, 2010 is the date, and the new mortgage rule changes go into effect today.

Our office did a presentation to 50 realtors and clients last week, and below are the three videos that came from it where the changes are discussed at much, much greater length than previously.

Enjoy!

Transcription of Video Blogs (All 3)

PART 1

Wayne: I want to take this opportunity to welcome all of you to this presentation. As you are all aware, there have been multiple changes that have taken place in the mortgage financing business over the last couple of weeks and most of it is taking place this Monday. Thus, the reason for this seminar. From my point of view, these are probably the most changes in a very short period of time since I’ve been brokering, which is over 15 years now. We hope that this presentation will give you a better understanding of the changes so that you can modify your business plans accordingly, if necessary.
We are doing this presentation in three segments, but we encourage you, if you have any questions during the presentation to just raise your hand. I’ll bring the microphone over and you can ask your questions, rather than waiting until the end of the presentation.

At this time, I would like, if you haven’t, maybe to turn your cell phones to silent mode so that we don’t get interrupted. We’re ready to get started, and first up will be Maury. So Maury, take it away.

Maury: OK. Can everybody hear me without this? That sounds all right. Yeah. OK, so what the hell’s going on? Well, hopefully today we’ll try and address these questions. Today, what we’re going to cover is a quick into and just making sure we understand the difference between high ratio and conventional because that is going to kind of set up explaining the changes and making sure when you know the changes apply and don’t.

There is a set of government mandated changes that we’re going to be going over. That will be followed by the insurers that have some changes that they will be setting up for some of their programs, specifically, self employed and rental programs. That’s pretty much going to wrap it up.

We’re going to have questions at the end, but also, as we’re going through to try and make sure that we’re covering each topic and it’s clear. If you have a question, please ask it when you have it.
So starting out here. The high ratio conventional, by definition, when a deal is defined as high ratio, whenever there is less than 20 percent down payment going into the deal.
This is the same definition at all banks.

When there is less than 20 percent, the deal has to be insured. It can be insured by any one of the three insurance companies we have in Canada. CMHC is by far the largest one used, but Genworth is second, and there is also AIG.

The bank typically decides. The bank usually develops a relationship with one or two of the insurance companies. They typically choose where the deal will best fit at the insurance company. They are all pretty much the same. The fees are the same. It’s pretty much lying to the client, for all intents and purposes, but there are three in Canada.

Then, conventional is when there is more than 20 percent in the deal. So just to do a broad category of high ratio and conventional.

We wanted to set that up because, the government mandated changes, these apply to all deals, at all banks, at all insurance companies when there is less than 20 percent down.

The first change is there is a new maximum amount someone can refinance their property to. So we’ll go over that more in a second here.

The second change is to help the banks. Insurance companies are going to determine the amount someone can qualify for, the amount of the mortgage, so this is changing.

The third change is there is a new minimum down payment requirement for a non owner occupied rental property.

There is one common misconception that is commonly asked about the changes is the new minimum down payment. If somebody is going to live on the property, there is no change to this. So if someone is going to buy a house and they’re going to live in it, there is no change. They can still buy with as little as five percent down.

The first change, the maximum refinance amount, it is, the limit now is 90 percent. So if someone has had a house, they’ve had it for a while. Maybe they’ve done rentals, they want to take equity out. They can now only go to 90 percent of the property’s value at the time that they want to do it. Before, it was 95 percent they could go up to.

This was more put in place to address some problems we’ve seen in the States, more than in Canada, where the market took property values up. People just refinancing every year and they weren’t really doing anything with the property, but kind of treating that house like a bank account. So it is to discourage this.

But in Canada, this product was not really used, they were never really taking, they might have been refinancing, but they were never taking it out to the max, for the most part, 95 percent. A change, but probably something that won’t affect most people.

This is a more significant change. This is the rate that is going to be used to determine how much people can qualify for a mortgage. There’s a couple of situations, so this is the first one.
If someone is going to be taking, or would like to take, a fixed rate mortgage of less than five years, a term of less than five years, or if they wanted any variable rate mortgage, this is what they have to do.

They have to qualify for the amount that they want using the Government of Canada benchmark posted rate.
Right now, it’s 5.85.? So I put “versus 3.85″ there because before today, someone could qualify for a variable rate mortgage using a much lower rate than they’re going to be forced to now.

If they want to qualify for a $500,000 loan and they want a variable rate mortgage, they’re going to have to try to qualify for the mortgage using that higher rate.

We’ll go into an example in a second, and you can see some numbers. So that’s the second case.

If someone says “Well, just forget it, I’m just happy with a five year fixed term, ” or “I’m going to take any term longer than five years with a fixed rate.” Guess what? You can use the rate, that’s the contract rate, the discounted rate, the rate that they’re actually going to get for their mortgage.

So clearly, you can see here, the point of using this higher rate, even though someone might be using a product that gives a lower rate, the government really wants to make sure that someone is going to be able to afford their payment over a significant amount of time.

Everybody knows we had record low rates, variable rates, like bottom basement, right? They’re only going to go up and there kind of wants to be some assurances in place that people are going to be able to afford their mortgage if it goes up two percent on a variable or if they have to renew in a year and rates have gone up. That they have comfort that they know that they are going to be able to make their payments at time of renewal.

I’ll give you an example. In this example, what we’re going to use is that we’re going to use someone that has a gross annual income of $60,000 per year. I used average property taxes amount, and I’m assuming they have no other debts, car loans, student loans, stuff like that.

The old max, meaning that 3.85 rate, so if someone was taking a very low rate mortgage or something, yesterday this person, or these two people or whatever it is could have qualified for a mortgage amount, not just a purchase price, but a mortgage amount of $439,000.

So if this person today says, “I still want a variable rate mortgage but I have to qualify for this thing under the new guidelines of 5.85.” They’re only going to be able to qualify for a mortgage for $342,000.
They can still have a variable rate mortgage, but the amount that they can get if they want a variable or a term less than five years is much lower. But then, there is some saving grace there. That if you say, “Forget it, I’ll take a five year fixed because then I qualify for it at the rate I am going to get.” They can qualify for a mortgage of $396,000.

So clearly, especially in Vancouver, there’s going to be a pressure, a funnel, I would say, to more people maybe taking a five year fixed. In order to qualify for the amount they need. It may not be a huge deal for a lot of people, there is a clear preference in Canada for five year fixed, but we all know that everybody doesn’t take a five year fixed.
This has just been how the numbers line up with the qualifications, so any questions on this one? [pause] No?

OK, so the last…

PART 2:

Maury: So the last change is the minimum down payment for rental properties. The new minimum down payment is 20 percent, and it was previously five percent.

So someone, if they qualified, had enough income, had enough rental income coming from the property, they could buy it. There were programs available for as little as five percent down. They did have a hefty, hefty insurance premium because the deal, of course, was insured, but it could be done.

So if that property was $500,000 before, obviously $25,000 minimum, and there will be the insurance but now, obviously, 20 percent of 500 is 100, so if they’re going to rent it out, they are going to need a much larger down payment.

This does not apply to second homes. There is a category of non owner occupied properties which are deemed as second homes. So a true second home, meaning you cannot count any rental income coming from it, in order to qualify for the mortgage.

This is not affected by this, you can still buy those. You don’t need to put 20 percent down. But if you need the rental income generated to qualify then you will need 20 percent down.

That is it. So the next section here, I will just turn over to Rowan.

Rowan: All right, so Maury covered what a conventional mortgage is and all of these changes that apply, as we have been talking about high ratio so the government mandated changes apply to things, there are three different changes; the investments, refinance, and the amount of down payment that is required.

However, just because that only applies to 80 percent financing or more, that less than 20 percent down, there’s actually more banks that are going to follow that all the way down the road. It doesn’t matter if you have 35 or 40 or 50 percent down, a lot of banks are still going to follow these new guidelines.

The reason is kind of complicated and involves how the banks raise their money in the markets and whatnot. But if they’re going to be doing that, you can see that these changes and there’s a lot of lenders that are going to be following that. I would say half or more.

It’s going to have a lot of impact for any loans of value, even though the mandated change only applies to 20 percent down or less.

So rental income changes, in Vancouver, this is huge. As we’ve heard, the percentage of properties, especially the condo market, is rentals. It’s definitely the most dramatic change, and ironically, this one isn’t even mandated. This is simply something that come down through CMHC and then all the other insurers have jumped on board with similar policies, not identical.

We have three different insurers we talked about. We’re not going to get into the specifics of who does exactly what type of product. But I can say that the rental industry is treated far less valuably than it was in the past.

Now this includes rental income from multiple different sources. You’ve seen on purchases, you see mortgage helper, you see in-law suites, you see nanny suites, it doesn’t matter what you call it.

If it’s a secondary suite within the property, if there is a second kitchen and as a rate they are bringing in revenue for this property, than that income is going to be treated far less favorably than it was.

It used to be that you could take a certain percentage of that income, say 80 percent is the number. OK, and we would go “You have got $1,000 in rent, you’ve got $800 we’re allowed to use. How much mortgage does that support?” The answer was like $180,000 or something. So right away the person qualified for $180,000 more just by virtue of having that suite in the property.

Well in Vancouver, we’ve got the whole authorized/unauthorized suite issue, right? And if something is authorized, can we use it? If it is unauthorized, can we use it? And the answers vary from insurer to insurer, so that’s something where the brokers have to know every one of the guidelines and rules for the different institutions.

Let me give you an example of how the new rules are going to take effect. We’re going to take the same example, say $60,000 average cost, clean credit, et cetera. So this is assuming a $1,000 basement suite. 680 to 515, so the old approval amount. In Vancouver, if you can picture East Vancouver, almost every home has a basement suite.

Picture Surrey, all these different areas. All these basement suites that we were previously able to bring into the mix. We can, but at a much lesser and more constricted treatment. That’s a 24 percent decline or reduction in how much somebody can qualify for based on that income. 24 percent is going to translate into an effect on how many buyers can afford properties in a particular price.

Now rental income, I was just talking about suites there, but it comes from multiple sources including three different ways, the basement suite, then you’ve got your rental property.

You’re living in your home, maybe you have a rental condo and it’s rented out. This third one is really where the rules are murky. That is going to be interesting to see how that plays out. When someone owns a home, especially a first time home buyer, they own their property, they want to upgrade to a new property, but they don’t want to sell the first one.

Maybe they’ve been there five years, they’ve built up significant equity, maybe the property can rent for a specific amount. So they want to get out of that property and move into a home. In that circumstance, that is where the treatment of that income for the old property is not really clear, the reason being is that they don’t have it at this point in time.

So if somebody has a rental property and they’ve had it for an extended period of time, the new rules actually favor those, that treatment of that income over all else, as long as the people are declaring it to pay tax on it. Going forward it will be far, far harder to qualify.

So you should declare it anyway because then you can offset your interest with a possible mortgage, so it makes sense to declare it but a lot of people still aren’t doing it. Is there any questions on the rental income or how this affects suites being authorized or unauthorized? That’s the rental income section.

I’m going to pass it over to Leah who is going to cover self employed.

Leah: All right, so pretty much all of us in this room are self employed so you can probably relate to this section as to how this is going to affect you specifically. Definitely clients who I encounter in Vancouver, a lot of self employed people.

Up until now, there has been a program called the Stated Income Program. Now, it’s exactly that, you are stating your income. And the reason that they have this is because in businesses, if you are a mechanic, you’re getting a lot of cash jobs.

Like us, we write off our cars, our cell phones, even part of our homes, and our rents, and our mortgage amounts. So because of this, banks and lenders, the insurers, even they understand that there is bit of a grey area. What exactly are you making at the end of the day because you have all these write offs?

So what they’ve done is they invented a program called the Stated Income Program. They’ve had this for quite some time and with this, traditional income verification is not necessary. You don’t have to show your D4s, what you’re simply doing is “I make $60,000 a year,” or whatever sounds reasonable.

Now with this, it isn’t that good to be true because you are going to have higher premiums with this which of course is more costs. You can’t just say that you sell coins or you collect bottle caps and you make over $100,000 a year. It does have to be reasonable.

How do they deem reasonable? Well, there are various amounts of things that leads me into where the changes are. Before they were a lot more lenient on what was deemed reasonable. Now they’re really focusing on different websites and economic studies and they’re going to ask you first, “What do you think you make?”

And then they’re going to look at what their stats tell them. If that seems to fall within their realm, they will deem it reasonable and they will accept it. Now the other change, and again, this is only for the Stated Income Program, the down payment has changed.

It used to be you only have to put down five percent, but it is now going to be a minimum of 10 percent down payment. That’s not to say that if you are self employed that you automatically have to pay 10 percent. It’s only if you decide to use the Stated Income Program.

With that being said, proving your income is always going to obviously stand up stronger with the lenders. So if you are able to, if you are properly declaring how much you make, and you’re paying taxes on that, you might if you are self employed, whatever it shows on line 150 on your tax returns, you actually get to add 15 percent of that back, to account for write offs. So if you’re able to, use proven income rather than stated income. You’ll save on your premiums and you’ll be able to put down a lower down payment down if you like.

As well, like Rowan mentioned, each insurer is a little bit different and so their internal policies are varying based on the amount of years you’ve been in the industry and the amount of years that you’ve actually been in your own business.

So that again is where…

PART 3:

Leah: …two years and maybe they’ve done it in their own business for 25 years. That is going to depend, or we’re going to have to then look at different insurers and we can send it to one insurer, but we can’t send it to another. So they do have differences of opinions on that.

So, this is actually a really short and sweet presentation. So, again, at this point, I will actually stop. Does anyone have questions on the self-employed program or anything that we’ve covered up until now? Yes.

Audience Member: Can we get a list of incomes which they will use for assessment?

Leah: Oh, of what they’re going to use? I don’t know. Are there websites that they can go to?

Maury: You mean when they’re looking at the reasonability test? They don’t really disclose that info to us. They have their own internal guidelines.

Leah: Yeah, because they’re really just going to state something in that, right?

Man 1: Isn’t it public knowledge?

Maury: Not really. No, they use a number of different sites that they look at. Let’s say somebody is a contractor, there’s a “range of most contractors in Canada” file. They can look at that information.

If someone says $250,000, they can look at that site and go, “Well, you know, by this they only made $60,000 or $70,000″ and that’s the number they’ll use. But I don’t believe that we have access to this.

Leah: Yeah.

Guest 1: For the States, it’s available free.

[crosstalk]

Leah: Yeah here it’s not so much.

Guest 1: If you guys want to know what a lot of business are making, we use labor market information. So you have an LMI or BC or for your province and you’ll find it probably, LMI.

Leah: LMI. It’s also important to know as well, one of the — which is on [inaudible 01:36] here — having a mortgage broker that you can go to and using as a resource. Because we deal with these, we can literally call up any one of our lenders right now and have a one-on-one conversation with them.

There is grey area. If you do have a contractor and maybe he really does make a crazy amount of income because he has so many people working for him or so many projects on the go, we’re able to have that relationship to somewhat tell the real truth of the situation.

If there is a good argument for it, there is always that possibility of things happening as well. So that’s really important to have a good relationship with your broker. Because you do speak to the lenders one-on-one every single day. So, leaving that into the to-do list-is there any other questions before we get on?

All right. So, first thing on your to-do list is definitely knowing your mortgage broker, especially for the Realtors in the room. You’re spending all of this time with your clients and to just say, “Go to your bank and take care of it on your own.” Not what I would encourage because with the banks, they have very tight regulations.

They also are out to make as much of an interest rate as possible. So, maybe your client won’t qualify for as much, or whatever the case may be. We’re actually able to handhold your client and insure that it’s getting done. Plus, we’re able to call you and we can tag team with you on the client to make sure that they’re getting us the paperwork that we need in the certain amount of time. Make sure that you get your approval deadlines on time.

Now, full disclosure of income and sources, this is more for clients. For those of you who are getting a mortgage yourself, you have to fully disclose not just what you make, but where the sources are coming from. There is, again, a lot of grey area in terms of income.

So, if you think you make $80,000 a year, because that’s what you made last year, it might not be. You may only make $60,000 because of a two-year average or based on your commissions and bonuses that aren’t going to qualify, or things of that nature. So, you need to not only disclose your income, but always your sources.

Prepare your documents early. If you go into the bank and ask for a pre-approval — which is actually the next point on here — if you’re approved, you’ll go into your bank and they’ll say, “Well, how much do you make? Do you have any payments?” So they’re taking things for face value and they’re basically saying, “Well, based on what you tell us, if all that is true, then you qualify for X amount.”

You go to a mortgage broker, then they’re not only going to ask you those question and take you for face value, but then they’re going to follow up on you and say, “OK, let’s start doing that paperwork together.”

And essentially what they’re doing is they’re going through the full approval process for you so that when you as a Realtor take your client or as a client you find that home of your dreams, and then you go to get approved and you realize, “Well, I thought I made this much.”

Or, “Oh, I thought I could get my paperwork together.” Or, “I thought I had this down payment. You mean I can’t use my credit card for my down payment?” Or whatever the case may be, you’re not going to have that disappointment of losing the property. So, get your documents before even looking at properties, get everything in order.

Then, again, confirming the pre-approval of the appropriate paperwork, a mortgage broker should go through all that for you. If you’re unsure what paperwork you are going to need, ask, and they will definitely let you know.

So, with that being said, are there any questions? Because we’re pretty much — we’re there. We’ve gone through all the requirements. Yes.

Woman 1: Are you still giving 120 days guarantee on the rate?

Leah: It depends on the lender. Some of them are 60, some are 90, some are 120; it’s all internal policy. So, yeah, depending on what the rate is, your broker can let you know at that time what the rate hold will be.

That’s something to note as well. If you want to get pre-approved, a lot of us brokers in the room here, we can do that on the phone for you, we can give you pre-approval of an amount. If you want to get an actual rate hold, you need to let us know because that actually takes a bit more of a process to go through.

We have to start actually choosing which lender you’re going to go with, and pre-approve you and give you that rate hold of 90 or 120 days. But, in general, for your pre-approval, we can tell you a number and to get going, but it’s different than a rate block.

Any other questions? You guys are all awesome! You know what you’re talking about now? All right. I guess we can — do you want to go ahead and close this up?

Wayne: Sure. The final thing I wanted to say, I guess, is for the Realtors out here or people who are sending their clients to the bank. I plug the mortgage brokerage industry with these new financing rules and things like that.

You really should have a broker as a first choice, but definitely a broker as a second choice. Just as a second opinion. The reason is, we didn’t want to make this too technical, but as we showed in an earlier slide, there were three insurance companies.

Realistically, not all the banks use all three. For example, very few lending institutions use AIG. They’re probably going to be disappearing off the map. So, when you need, say, a basement suite income or a self-employed program, there are variances from not only the institutional internal guidelines, but also with the insurance company.

I’ll give you a classic example — Scotiabank does use Genworth and Genworth does do illegal basement suites, which is great for Vancouver, but Scotiabank does not. So if you send your client to Scotiabank and that’s their home bank, and they want to purchase something — they’re going to qualify, basically, only on their income without any rental income.

If they want to buy something a little bit more expensive, you want a second opinion. And, as a broker, that’s where we come in and we can mix and match between the insurers and the lenders, we know what each one does.

We could, in a sense, get them a little bit more money to get into that dream home in Vancouver rather than, say, moving out to Burnaby — which is not a bad thing.

[laughter]

Wayne: So, I think that I would encourage you to use brokers to begin with because there’s 40, 50 different lenders and there’s all mix and match. But more importantly, if the client says, “Oh, I’ve been to see my bank, this is what they qualified me for,” but it doesn’t line up with what their expectations are, at least give one of the brokers in this room a call. Get a second opinion. We may be able to get them that little bit extra to get them into the home that they want. OK?

Other than that, we will be around if you have any further questions. Thank you all for coming and best of luck in the spring market.

Too Late To Get April 19 CMHC Mortgage Rules Changes?

Saturday, April 17th, 2010

I took more calls today than I could count asking, “Is it too late to get in under the old rules?”

The short answer is: “YES”

The reality is that lenders are swamped with applications from people that got them in within the last 7 days. They’ve been working around the clock to the mortgages submitted.

However, the first question I ask when I get this request is, “Do the changes even apply to you?”

The changes primarily affect investors, variable rates, and rental or self employment income. If this isn’t you, then rest easy. Otherwise, watch this video blog that explains it in greater detail.

Transcription of Video:

Hi everyone, it’s Rowan Smith with the Mortgage Centre.

Today is Friday, April 16th and a lot of people have called me today and said, “am I too late to get in on the old mortgage rules?”

And the first question I always ask them is, “What mortgage rules are you afraid you will be missing out on?”

In many cases people say to me, “well I want to refinance my house and take out some equity,” or they say, “I want to buy a place.”

I say to them, the three changes only affect three things. I guess technically, four things.

One, self employed people that can’t prove their income.

Two, investment properties.

Three, qualifying for variable rate mortgages.

Four, refinancing to 95 percent.

If none of that is you, then you don’t have to worry about the changes. However, for those of you that do fit into those categories, chances are, YES, if you are watching this video it is after or on April 16th, and it is too late.

Even though the laws change on April 19th, our ability to get you realistically approved and reviewed by the relevant parties (in time) is slim to none.

If you do have somebody in this situation, and you want to at least explore the option of perhaps getting it put before CMHC or one of the other mortgage insurers on Monday, please give me a call over the weekend. I’ll make myself available.

My name is Rowan Smith, for the Mortgage Centre.